Outlanderday Cooking: Atholl Brose Experiment!

Previous Outlander Post: https://timeslipsblog.wordpress.com/2014/08/30/outlander-the-gathering-and-some-shinty/

 

Earlier this morning, my daughter peered into a bowl of oats soaking in water,  gave me a very skeptical look and commented, “What do you plan on doing with this mess?” This look was much the same sort she gave me last night when she spied the bottle of Whisky on the counter! We are not normally Whisky drinkers so this was a highly unusual purchase on my part. I told her I needed it for a recipe and she gave me an even more suspicious look. I am pretty sure she might be very concerned about our dinner menu for tonight? While she is a devoted Outlander fan, she is not so sure we should delve quite so deeply into the food offerings… though, she was reasonably impressed with the Bannocks. Her response to the Bannocks was, “Well, those aren’t nearly so bad as I thought they might be” as she helped herself to another one!

oats in water

 

As suspicious as she is with the Atholl Brose and the Whisky, I think I will keep the turnips a secret until after she’s eaten the Clapshot Rosti later this evening…

 

For now, we’ll just focus on the Atholl Brose experiment!  I found the inspirational recipe for this drink at Outlanderkitchen.com: http://outlanderkitchen.com/2014/08/20/atholl-brose-outlander-starz-episode-103/

 

Atholl Brose (or Athol Brose, Athole Brose) is a Scottish drink obtained by mixing oatmeal brose, honey, whisky, and sometimes cream (particularly on festive occasions). When made with cream the drink is rather like Baileys Irish Cream. Atholl Brose has also become an alternative name for the dessert Cranachan, which uses similar ingredients.

According to legend, the drink is named after the 1st Earl of Atholl, who quashed a Highland rebellion in 1475 by filling the rebel leader’s well with the mixture, making him easily captured.

 

I was a bit leery of trying this recipe mainly because as I’ve mentioned, none of us are Whisky drinkers. When I read the comparison to Bailey’s though, I was interested in trying it.  Initially, I did even debate on using something other than Whisky in it. While out shopping, I found some Dewar’s Highland Honey Whisky, and decided to give the Whisky a try.

wpid-20140829_162753.jpg

 

I did follow Theresa’s recipe for the most part and only made a few minor changes to it.  The first step is soaking the rolled oats in water overnight to make Oat Milk.  I used a suggestion for creamier milk mixture by putting the oats and water in the blender and pulsing it for about 10 seconds. After that process, strain the oats out by squeezing the mixture through cheese cloth or muslin.  Throw out the leftover oat pulp, unless you can find some other use for it? You will add your whisky and honey to the saved milk, blend it together with whisk.  I only used 1/2 cup of Whisky rather than full cup as I wasn’t sure about the whisky taste yet.  I used a Cinnamon Vanilla Creamer instead of regular cream, and added a bit more of it to make up for the lesser amount of Whisky. 

I used cheese cloth to line my strainer and then just squeezed out the rest of the milk/water from with my hands.

atholl_brose_5

 

Once you’ve mixed everything together, put it in the fridge to chill before drinking. I did taste test it before putting it in the fridge for later and it was quite good! My only thoughts on my experiment with this is that by using the Creamer, it is a little thin? I think I will add a bit of heavy cream to it before serving… and maybe a splash more of the Whisky! After tasting it, I am kind of wishing I would have made a double recipe of it!

 

You can serve it with or without the cream added. This picture shows both options!

Atholl Brose with and without creme

 

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